February 7, 2014

AIDS. 2014 Feb 4. [Epub ahead of print]

Bani-Sadr F, Loko MA, Pambrun E, Winnock M, Carrieri P, Gilbert C, Duvivier C, Bouchaud O, Gervais A, Dabis F, Salmon D; for the ANRS CO 13 HEPAVIH Study Group.

Abstract

The impact of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related characteristics such as genotype, viral load or liver fibrosis on the chances of achieving sustained HIV suppression in coinfected patients is not fully documented. We examined the relationship between both HIV/HCV-related and sociobehavioural characteristics and HIV sustained viral suppression (SVS) in 897 patients included in the ANRS CO13 HEPAVIH cohort. The main outcome variable was HIV SVS, defined as at least two consecutive undetectable HIV viral loads. Among the 897 HIV/HCV-coinfected patients, 419 (47%) had received HCV therapy at least once, and 103 patients (25%) had experienced an HCV sustained virologic response (SVR). In multivariate analysis, older age [odds ratio (OR) 1.23 for each period of 5 years of age, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.49; P = 0.03], a higher level of school education (OR 1.92, 95% CI 1.04-3.56; P = 0.04), good adherence to HIV therapy (OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.23-3.43; P = 0.006) and HCV SVR (OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.01-3.26; P = 0.04) remained significantly associated with HIV SVS. In contrast, triple nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) regimens were associated with failure to achieve HIV SVS (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.27-0.94; P = 0.03). Our results show that HCV SVR is associated with a higher likelihood of achieving HIV SVS. With the advent of direct-acting anti-HCV drugs, a marked increase in the rate of virologic response is observed in coinfected patients. So, further research is needed to determine whether suppression of HCV replication could be associated with a higher efficacy of antiretroviral therapy.

PMID: 24499953 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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